BIOMECHANICS

It's All About the Way You Move

Human movement is predominated by walking, running and throwing. These patterns require the coordinated function and sequencing of the entire body — from head to toe and from hand to opposite foot. When this happens, a coordinated rotation between the upper and lower body occurs that results in the efficient generation of power. This power is created by the Functional Lines. The Functional Lines create a “sling system” that connects one shoulder through the core to the opposite leg essentially creating an “x” pattern in the front and back of the body. The sling system is the primary driver of human biomechanics. The body’s limbs help drive the rotation by moving in an opposing fashion called “Contralateral Reciprocation.”

Functional Front Line
Functional Back Line
Functional Front Line
Functional Back Line

How Functional Is Your Training?

Functional Training has become a prevalent term in training. It is meant to describe movements that replicate or translate to human biomechanics. For training to be truly functional, it must then incorporate the precise sequencing and coordination of the entire muscular system to produce efficient movement. Traditional training methods do not encompass these characteristics. Instead, these methods often disconnect the muscular system creating imbalances and discoordination across the entire body, increasing the probability of injury. Additionally, these methods move primarily in the vertical plane. This may compress the body if posture has not been normalized or a vertical load is applied. However, human movement occurs in a three-dimensional plane and, as such, so should training.

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